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24/04/2018

5 quick exercises to help you eliminate belly fat

5 quick exercises to help you eliminate belly fat

This is so because the visceral fat in the middle of the body makes toxins that affect the way the body works.

And cytokines, which is one of the toxins, increases the chances of heart disease and make the body less sensitive to insulin at the same time. Thus leading to a condition which causes diabetes.

This, among many other reasons, is why most women consider belly fat as one of the most annoying experiences that one can possibly experience.

And for the good number of them, getting a lean midsection is a desire that has become a dream.

However, in this article, you will be shown how to eliminate those unwanted belly fats. All that is required of you is a deep sense of commitment that will help you scale through the interesting process.

Here are some effective workouts that will help you get rid of those unwanted belly fats.

1. Crunches

When it comes to the elimination of belly fat, no exercise does it faster than crunches. However, there are some certain things that should be noted before getting started:

Don't enter the full sit-up position while performing crunches; just raise your back a few inches from the ground.

This will prevent the chances of you hurting your back.

Also, jerking your head forward while doing crunches will put pressure on your neck and result in pain.

Here's how to perform crunches exercise

Lie down flat on a mat with your knees bent and feet on the ground. Alternatively, you can also lift your legs off the floor at a 90-degree angle. (See picture).

Lift your hands and place them behind your head, or keep them crossed on your chest.

Inhale deeply, and as you lift your upper torso off the floor, exhale.

Inhale again as you get back down, and exhale as you come up.

Do this for 10 times as a beginner.

Repeat another two to three sets.

2. Plank

The plank, like every other exercise, has its own basic function. It is a core strengthening exercise that works the transversus abdominis muscle.

Although some certain amount of calories will be burnt during the process of performing the exercise, its primary purpose is to strengthen the midsection and reduce low back pain.

Here's how to perform plank exercise

Start by assuming a pushup position and bend your elbows as you lower yourself down until you can shift your weight from your hands to your forearms

Your body should form a straight line. Brace your abs and hold for sixty seconds. If you can't make it to sixty seconds, hold for five to ten seconds and rest for five seconds, continuing for one minute.

Focus on form: Don't drop your hips or raise your butt.

3. Side crunch

The side crunch exercise can be said to be one of those exercises that were specially designed to reduce fats in the belly region. And interestingly, side crunch can be practiced without much physical stress and strain.

Here's how to perform side crunch exercise

Lie on your back and use your hand to support your head.

Bend your knees and carefully rotate your hips to the left

Slightly lift your shoulders off the floor and squeeze the obliques as you hold for few seconds

Return slowly to the starting position and switch sides repeatedly.

4. Vertical leg crunch

The vertical leg crunch is a traditional exercise that can be very effective when it comes to burning belly fat. Like the prank exercise, this exercise aims at strengthening the middle as well as the side abdominal muscles.

Here's how to perform a vertical leg crunch

With your back to the floor, stretch your legs upwards and cross one knee over the other

Now breathe in and lift your upper body from the floor towards the pelvis.

Breathe out slowly as you bring yourself down, breathe in again, and exhale as you go up.

Do twelve to fifteen reps and up to three sets.

5. The captain's chair

The Captain's chair exercise has been found to be one of the best exercises to work the muscles of the abdomen. As a matter of fact, the American Council on Exercise named it to be one of the most effective ab exercises.

Here's how to perform the captain's chair exercise

With a straight spine and a well-relaxed shoulder, take a sitting position on a comfortable chair.

Keep both hands beside you with your palms by the side of your hips, facing downward.

Inhale deeply.

As you exhale, bring both your legs upwards such that your knees are close to your chest. Hold for five seconds. Don’t bend forward and arch your back.

Bring down your legs slowly and repeat.Read more at:yellow prom dresses | prom dress uk

12:29 Publié dans Fashion | Lien permanent | Commentaires (0)

04/04/2018

A hundred miles from Oxford Street

The fashion shopping scene has been virtually transformed over the past ten years or so. If the calendar were put back to 1960 I believe we should be astonished at how dull the shops would seem. The contrast would be greatest in the suburbs and provincial towns, because of the boutiques that have blossomed in the high streets and the multiplying branches of fashion chains. Also, many provincial department stores have changed hands, been modernised, adopted new methods of display, self-service, shops-within-shops, and so on. There are more out-of-London branches of famous London names. Miss Selfridge, for example, now has 18 branches. Fresh fashions come in all the time, not just at the beginning of new seasons.

Retail shops dress up to attract customers

Read more

The quickening fashion tempo can also be seen in the small, owner-run dress shops in good neighbourhoods, serving customers who appreciate personal attention and a selection of clothes that have been edited with discrimination. Such shops used to be called Madam shops – but not now. Neither the people who run them, nor the customers today answer to that description. Recently I received a letter from Cheltenham that began “Several months ago I opened my own shop, June Daybell, in Cheltenham’s fashionable Promenade. The shop aims to feature handpicked clothes, with an accent on quality at reasonable prices. There is great attention to style, colour and fabric, with a real endeavour to supply clothes which are not generally available outside London. We try to lead the customer forward to new trends.”

This last sentence particularly interested me. Mrs Daybell’s letter went on to say that in the provinces women attach a lot of importance to the guidance that fashion magazines and newspaper editorials give them. She included a list of her main suppliers and said that if ever we were featuring any clothes by one of them she would be very glad to be mentioned as a stockist. Clearly this was not just another eager amateur enthusing about yet another “totally different” boutique. I felt I would like to meet Mrs Daybell, and this was arranged.

A professional she turned out to be, although looking very young – no one would call her madam. She has been involved with fashion for twelve years, starting with a tough training at Lewis’s of Liverpool. She is now 31 years old, works a six day week; at least one day a week in London, and goes to see fashion abroad as often as possible.

The Paris prêt à porter she considers essential...“to get a lead, to catch the fashion message.” In the shop at present she has trousers and suits from GET (Gaston Jaunet of Paris); beachwear from Pascal of Nice; sandals and clogs from Paco Rabanne; silk shirts from Franck Olivier; a whole range of children’s clothes from Absorba, which she says are expensive but far and away the best in Europe. She has T-shirts from Trinet-Oy of Finland and from Sweden the whole collection of Hans Metzen, which includes the beautifully relaxed summer trouser suit on this page. English suppliers include Alistair Cowin and Stirling Cooper for separates. Jeff Banks “for their better shirts”; Georgina Linhart’s whole collection.

Mrs Daybell believes that basic clothes are coming back after the years of fashion chaos. This suits her fashion philosophy. . . “Fashion must be of use – people want clothes to live in, that will serve them for lots of occasions, according to the life they lead. But they do want to be in fashion.” She says that in the provinces they study the fashion magazines and reports in the newspapers, and need guidance when they are actually choosing, appreciate a shop where the clothes are well edited.

A woman should feel happy about her clothes, and Mrs Daybell was suggesting taking a dress on approval, trying it on again at home, seeing what her husband thinks, bringing it back if he hates it.Read more at:cheap prom dresses uk | graduation gowns

11:34 Publié dans Fashion | Lien permanent | Commentaires (0)

28/03/2018

This Stylist and Archivist Wants to Show You What the Real Fashion of the 1980s Looked Like

This much was unequivocally true of the Fall 2018 runway shows: The awesomely big, shoulder-padded extravagance of the 1980s is back. It’s a fashion era that has bobbed in and out of the collective conscious over the years, but now, the ’80s are really in ascendance: superpower suits at Marc Jacobs! Beverly Hills trophy wives at Tom Ford! Glam plaid at Versace! But there is one fashion collector who happens to disagree, at least in part, with all of the chatter surrounding the resurgence of Dynasty style. Ruth Kramer is a stylist and designer based between Frankfurt and Paris who has been collecting rare items by the likes of Thierry Mugler, Claude Montana, and Jean Paul Gaultier since the late 1970s. She has no formal background in fashion, other than a passion for unearthing rare vintage clothing, building her archive (which currently boasts over 100 pieces), and designing her own one-off avant-garde wares. Kramer knows the masters of 1980s fashion better than most outside of the inner circle of industry heavyweights, having attended her first Mugler show in 1978 and spent countless hours visiting the ateliers of Montana, Gaultier, Martin Margiela, and more in the years that followed. She knows the ’80s, and she doesn’t necessarily understand what all of the fuss is about.

“When you look at Marc Jacobs’s collection for example, I see the 1930s and the 1920s, not the 1980s” she explains. “At Marc Jacobs or Junya Watanabe, the silhouettes are much looser than those that were popular in the 1980s. The baggy cuts are more indicative of the 1920s and 1930s, not the 1980s where the waists were always tight. The use of layering nods to the 1920s and 1930s, as well. This I saw some of at Tom Ford, in the ruffled dresses, big sweaters, and heavy outerwear over the metallic and animal-print leggings.” She adds, “I think people are jumping too quickly to call this moment a comeback for 1980s fashion trends alone. There are finer details, like the loose cuts and layering, that really come from an earlier time period.” Kramer believes that the industry’s eyes are focused on the era of spandex and side ponytails almost subconsciously, due to the political and social tumult we are currently reliving today, especially in New York. “The shows in New York were a bit more outwardly ’80s than London and Paris and Milan,” she says. “This makes sense when you look at what’s going on in America right now.”

Truth be told, Kramer has never really been all that interested in keeping up with seasonal trends anyway, which is why she’s remained a loyal fan of houses like Comme des Garçons, Kansai Yamamoto, and Junya Watanabe. “The Japanese designers never care about trends, and especially not the 1980s,” she says. “They may start with something like a men’s pin-striped suit from that era but then they are able to completely distress it and take it apart, turn it into something that we’ve never seen before.” Kramer adds, “Being around people like this in fashion, and spending decades sourcing vintage, that’s how I got my education in fashion.” It’s true she isn’t a scholar or editor or trained fashion designer, but perhaps Kramer’s opinion is one we should pay attention to. After all, she lives with the fashion that defined the 1980s—the cinched waist of Mugler’s jackets, Watanabe’s fanny pack, and the sculpted shoulders so associated with Montana. In Kramer’s words, “every designer is constantly hunting for new ideas, but we have to remember that it’s all been done before. It should always be about the designer taking bits and pieces from the past, from various decades and not just one, mixing them together to blend the old with the new so that their clothes don’t look like they belong to any time period in particular—except maybe one that can exist in the future.”Read more at:pink prom dresses uk | prom dresses uk

 

08:35 Publié dans Fashion | Lien permanent | Commentaires (0)